Wax Woes: The Color (Not) Purple

Your book baby is special. Your book baby is unique. You love your book baby even when, after publication—and despite your best efforts and those of your copyeditor—you discover there’s somehow a typo on page nine.

These things happen, but, hey, we do our best, and we feel the same way about our candles: once they’re out in the world, they are as they are.

This brings us to wax discoloration, which is, yes, something you may notice from time to time with soy wax candles.

What is wax discoloration?

It’s, well, the discoloration of a candle’s wax after it’s been burning. This may or may not happen to your candle depending on how much citrus, floral, or vanilla fragrances are in the scent blend we’ve developed for it.

And, yes—even dye-free candles like ours may start to yellow over time.

When does wax discoloration occur?

Like we said earlier, some candles are more prone to discoloration depending on the makeup of the candle’s scent blend. In fact, candles that feature citrus, floral, or vanilla fragrance oils are more likely to become discolored immediately after the initial pour.

More often, however, discoloration occurs during or after the burn process. A candle’s melt pool may yellow (or become off-white) when resolidifying post-burn.

Is there a problem with my candle? Can I fix it?

Simply put, no and no. Discoloration is a feature of dye-free candles. We could, yes, remedy this by adding white dye to our candles, but due to health concerns surrounding the use of dyes, that’s not something we intend to do now or in the future.

If you do have concerns about discoloration, there’s a reason we diversify our offering at any given time to feature candles outside the citrus, floral, or vanilla fragrance camp!

As is the case with frosting, mushrooming wicks, and pitting, with discoloration we also have to embrace the Japanese concept of Wabi-Sabi. That said, we still want you to reach out if you have any performance-related questions about your KYD candles.